2020 Issue of New Jersey English Journal Available Now!

NJEJ 2020 CoverWe are thrilled to announce the publication of the 2020 issue of New Jersey English Journal, the journal of NJCTE, the New Jersey affiliate of NCTE. We are proud to share work from writers in New Jersey and across the country, including practicing and preservice ELA teachers, as well as teacher educators. Writers responded to the theme, “What’s Next? Embarking Upon a New Decade of English Language Arts,” in research articles, poetry, and reflective pieces. In response, writers addressed a variety of topics, including:

  • Young Adult literature
  • social justice
  • artificial intelligence
  • climate change
  • mindfulness

All pieces are open access and free to read and download! Thank you to our authors, reviewers, and the editorial board for them help in bringing this issue to life!

2021 Call for Manuscripts 

Check out our call for manuscripts and consider submitting a research article, personal reflection, or poem to our 2021 issue, “Course Correction: The Adaptive Nature of English Language Arts.” We seek submissions related to the current pandemic.

2020 Issue of New Jersey English Journal Available Now!

Call for Manuscripts: 2020 Issue of New Jersey English Journal

New Jersey English Journal, a peer-reviewed publication of New Jersey Council of Teachers of English, invites you to share submissions on the theme, “What’s Next? Embarking Upon a New Decade of English Language Arts.” 

We seek research and practitioner-oriented pieces (1000-2000 words), as well as personal essays (700-1000 words) and other creative responses related to the theme and geared towards an audience of P–12 and postsecondary English Language Arts educators. In addition to submissions that respond to the theme, we also welcome poetry on the topic of teaching.

We welcome single and co-authored submissions from both veteran and new teachers, and we especially invite new writers, pre-service teachers, and graduate students to develop submissions. Writers are urged to read past editions available online at www.njcte.org to review past successful submissions.

We invite you to respond to the theme of “What’s Next? Embarking Upon a New Decade of English Language Arts” by considering such questions as:

  • In what ways has the ELA classroom evolved? How, if at all, will the role of ELA teachers change in the future?
  • How and when can ELA teachers make space for new voices, texts, and approaches?
  • In what ways might interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary approaches shape teaching and learning in ELA and beyond?
  • How have your teaching methods evolved over time, or in what ways do you anticipate they will evolve? What factor(s) catalyzed these shifts? (e.g, technological innovation, the sociopolitical landscape, learners’ interests and needs)
  • How can technology enhance traditional methods and/or create innovative modes for student communication, assessment, and learning? What opportunities and challenges does technology pose?
  • What’s next for ELA? Over the next 10 years, how will our students change? How might we need to change? Which traditions and practices will (or should) grow obsolete, and which should be preserved?

Submissions will be accepted until Friday, December 27, 2019, via www.njcte.org. All submissions will be reviewed through a double-blind process by multiple members of the Editorial Board. Submissions should not have been previously published or under review elsewhere. Manuscripts should follow MLA guidelines for citations. All writing should appear in Times New Roman 12 pt. font, and authors’ names and identifying information must be removed from all submissions. Send any queries to njenglishjournal@gmail.com.

Call for Manuscripts: 2020 Issue of New Jersey English Journal

New Jersey English Journal Spring 2019 — Table of Contents

The New Jersey English Journal, 2019 Issue, Volume 8

The Intersection of Literacy and Democracy: What role does language arts play in a free society?

This issue is published in full at https://www.njcte.org/n-j-english-journal
———————————————————————————————————–
Artists: Cole Bespalko, Bridget Fajvan, & Kendall Shirvan

Call for Manuscripts Letter from the Editors

Writers
Ray     
Sue Kenney

Getting It Done           Maureen Connolly

About Relationships, Nor Prerogatives: Editing the New Jersey English Journal        Julius Gottilla

Teaching: From the Inside Out           Jeffrey Pflaum

Picture Books Teach Empathy and Much More         Sheryl Lain

Choice Reading and the Intersection of Literacy and Democracy         Scott Hebenstreit

The Politics of Classroom Engagement:Practicing Nonpartisanship in a First-Year Writing Classroom       Maria Geiger

Conflict on March 24th            Liz deBeer and NJCTE Spring Conference Attendees

A Conversation about Overcoming Barriers to Using Social Justice in the Classroom through Critical Literacy          Rebecca Maldonado & Allison Wynhoff Olsen

I Said Poetry    Sara deBeer

Winter              Patricia Bender

 

New Jersey English Journal Spring 2019 — Table of Contents

New Jersey English Journal Spring 2019 Issue Available Now!

From the Editors of the NJ English Journal:

This letter is modified from the 2019 edition of the New Jersey English Journal, which can be found in full at https://www.njcte.org/n-j-english-journal. The table of contents and the call for manuscripts will follow in our next blog posts.

NJCTE journal cover 2019The Intersection of Literacy and Democracy:
What role does language arts play in a free society?

Literature allows us to be open, to listen to others and be curious.
Tracy K. Smith, Poet Laureate of the United States

Reflecting on the 2019 edition of the New Jersey English Journal’s theme regarding the intersection of Literacy and Democracy, we may envision Civil Rights leaders like John Lewis, who remind us about the stringent and often unfair literacy tests which prevented even educated people of color from voting.

Or the famed memoir Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, where Douglass stresses that learning to read and write gave him the tools to be viewed as fully human by others – and by himself: “Once you learn to read, you will be forever free,” he wrote.

Or the reports around the world, that the vast majority of illiterates are female. Why? Again, literacy is the means to freedom, and denying others literacy is a blatant form of oppression.

Moreover, the intersection of democracy and literacy must contain a generous space for listening, whether it is listening via reading others’ memoirs or listening to our students and colleagues. There can be no real dialogue without genuine listening. This may seem obvious, but listening brings its own demand, especially when the speakers and listeners do not agree – initially or ever. Zora Neale Hurston tell us, “There are years that ask questions, and years that answer them.” We are not always in the position to have sufficient time to listen to others, yet as teachers, and in this instance editors, we remain cognizant – even vigilant – about what it means to listen.

We have both been fortunate to work for a number of years as editors and judges – we have listened to a wide range of voices. Writers have challenged our own perspectives; most often they have broadened them. Liz as the editor-in-chief of this journal and various textbooks, and Patricia as one of the judges of the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Contest for high school students, Associate Editor of Peregrine, a literary magazine; both of us have served as writing coaches, paid or pro bono, for countless scholarships, fellowships, and residency applicants. In these cases, we are listening deeply to the life of another, as we have been trusted to help the applicant win a prize, secure needed funding, or create time to work on important projects. Without listening deeply, we cannot help. Each one of our voices is important, and we all need to work consistently on ways to make ourselves heard.

We have had the advantage – for 30 years – of a key resource in our work. We are friends as well as colleagues.  We have trusted each other enough to listen. Of course, we do not always agree. Our lives have been shaped by very different life experiences and will continue to be. So, what is the common ground? We are not inclined to suggest a recipe, but trust and curiosity have to be in the mix.

How does this connect to the theme of The Intersection of Literacy and Democracy:  What role does language arts play in a free society? Our responsibilities as editors, as teachers, as citizens involve listening even when it is difficult to do so.

The various entries of this journal present opportunities to listen to voices and views we may not have heard before, such as the views of a teacher who is offering ideas for “developing global competencies” or one wondering about graffiti on a desk.

We hear reminders of the ever-present connection between literacy and democracy in Sara deBeer’s poem about teaching poetry to homeless students.  We hear it in the speeches and tweets by March for Our Lives student leaders, and depicted on the graffiti board from the 2018 Spring Conference. We hear it in Sheryl Lain’s “Picture Books Teach Empathy and Much More,” where she asserts that picture books’ messages of empathy and tolerance help model a more democratic classroom, because they demonstrate “Listening, sharing words, and working with others [which] not only creates a warm classroom but also works to develop better citizens outside of the classroom.”

This is our last year as editors of this journal; we gratefully and proudly introduce the next editors: Lauren Zucker and Emily Hodge. This tradition of collaboration continues, as Julius Gottilla reflects on his role as a former editor of this journal in his essay: “About Relationships, Not Prerogatives: Editing the New Jersey English Journal.” Julius stresses that the most important byproduct of his work is the friendships he developed among the editors and the writers.

We also develop relationships with the readers, some we may never meet.  When we listen, when we read others’ words, we often feel some connection, which, with hope, humanizes us and deepens our commitment to learning, to justice, to democracy.  While our roles are shifting, we intend to remain involved with this organization and to continue learning from each other.

Thank you for being part of our community of learners and teachers. We hope you visit the website www.njcte.org to read the journal and learn more about what we offer for New Jersey’s ELA teachers.

Sincerely,

Liz deBeer, Editor, and Patricia Bender, Assistant Editor

New Jersey English Journal, 2016 -2019

New Jersey English Journal Spring 2019 Issue Available Now!

New Jersey English Journal: 2018 Volume

Please join all of us at NJCTE in celebrating the publication of the 2018 volume of New Jersey English Journal. Congratulations to the writers, editor Liz DeBeer, and to all of the New Jersey English Journal editorial board. All of the contributions to the 2018 volume can be accessed at the NJCTE website.

New Jersey English Journal:
2018 Issue

Transformative Teaching in the 21st Century: Teachers as Catalysts

3  Call for Manuscripts

4  From the Editor
Liz deBeer

8  Shake Hands with the Muse
Marian Calabro

9  An Imaginary Party Sparks Academic Conversation
Lauren Zucker

12 Transforming Literacy Education for First-Generation College Students
Earl Aguilera and Geraldine Lopez

21 The Need to be FLEXible: Teaching English in the Republic of Georgia
Elliot Tombs

24 Tribute to M. Jerry Weiss: Professor, Author, Inspiration
Maria Schantz and Lois Sullivan

30  7:17 AM
Sue Kenney

31  Transformative Teaching: Rewriting the World in the English Classroom through Literature
Patricia Hans

40 The Growth of a Growth Mindset
Scott Hebenstreit

48 Dancing on Beat
Rachelle Parker

49 Finding Calm in a Sea of Doubt
Kelsey Kazmac

51 Coaching Writers: Three Lessons a Writing Teacher Can Learn from a High School Swim Coach
Jason J. Griffith

69 Composing Our Classrooms: A Veteran Provides Context for Inclusion and Collaborations
Anthony Albright

72  Rememory
Marian Calabro

73 Beyond Ability: How Disability Enables Us to See Injustice
Chris Bass

81  Education, not Standardization: (What if high-stakes testing were to be abolished?)
Joseph S. Pizzo

82  The Power of Class Discussion: The Art of Letting Kids Talk
Astrid Alvarez

88 Graphic Novels in the Pedagogical Literary Landscape: Persepolis & “The Cannon”
Nimisha Patel

95  My Ball
Rachelle Parker

96 Anonymous Online Polling: A 21st Century Discussion Hook
Maria Geiger

Artists:

Izzy Blanchard-Boyce, p. 39

Liz deBeer, p. 5

Bridget Fajvan, pp. 11, 48 & 98

Do you think you might be interested in contributing to New Jersey English Journal? We welcome your submissions! Please see our call for the 2019 volume.

Posted by Audrey Fisch, blog editor for NJCTE

New Jersey Council of Teachers of English, the New Jersey state affiliate of NCTE, the National Council of Teachers of English

New Jersey English Journal: 2018 Volume

2019 New Jersey English Journal – Call for Manuscripts

 New Jersey English Journal, a peer-reviewed publication of New Jersey Council of Teachers of English, invites you to share submissions on the theme: The Intersection of Literacy and Democracy:  What role does language arts play in a free society?  We seek researched articles as well as 500-word personal essays and other creative responses that shed light on the many possibilities, topics, issues, problems and solutions related to the theme of The Intersection of Literacy and Democracy at all grade levels from kindergarten to college. Spring 2018 NJ English Journal

Articles should relate directly to English Language Arts teaching and learning.  We value responses from both veteran and new teachers. Writers are urged to read past editions available online. The 2017 edition, on the theme Transformative Teaching in the 21st Century: Teachers as Catalysts, is available now!

We invite you to respond to the theme by considering these:

  • How can 21st century literacies enable us to participate more fully in today’s democracy?
  • How can ELA teachers connect the classroom to today’s society?
  • How can we teach students to find the truth in today’s media world?
  • Discuss reading, writing, global connectedness and free speech.
  • How can reading and writing affect change beyond the classroom?
  • How can we use speaking, listening and viewing to create more participatory citizens?
  • How do reading and writing teach us to listen and develop empathy?
  • Why do we need to read and write collaboratively?
  • In a connected world, how can we determine which texts are worthy of our attention?
  • How does interdisciplinary collaboration foster increased connection and awareness in a fully democratic society?

In addition to submissions that respond to the theme, we also welcome poetry on the topic of teaching.

Submissions will be accepted between April 1 and December 15, 2018. Submissions should not have been published in any other journal. Submissions must use MLA formatting and Times New Roman or Garamond in Size 12.  All submissions will be reviewed by multiple members of our editorial board.  Submitters will receive a response by February 1, 2019; the journal will be released by April 1, 2019.  Send queries and submissions to 2019 journal editor Liz deBeer at ldebeerwardell@gmail.com.

Posted by Audrey Fisch, blog editor for NJCTE

New Jersey Council of Teachers of English, the New Jersey state affiliate of NCTE, the National Council of Teachers of English

2019 New Jersey English Journal – Call for Manuscripts